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HomeOpinionEditorialBeating the Job Network $ystem

Beating the Job Network $ystem

It's been clear since 1996 when then Prime Minister John Howard privatised the Commonwealth Employment Service (CES) into the Job Network, now known as Workforce Australia that a for-profit model was built so private enterprises could make money from those unlucky enough to be unemployed.

It’s been clear since 1996 when then Prime Minister John Howard privatised the Commonwealth Employment Service (CES) into the Job Network, now known as Workforce Australia that a for-profit model was built so private enterprises could make money from those unlucky enough to be unemployed.

How you manage this can prevent Job Network providers from earning income and government ‘grants’ from your unemployment.

Whilst job seekers have to abide by the rules that are designed so the unemployed complete training activities and earn compliance points, there are various ways to do this.

There are also measures one can take to ensure that these private job network companies don’t make income from your unemployment.

  • If you see a suitable job offer or are asked to apply for a job through your Job Network provider simply take down the details yourself and apply by yourself without using any help from Job Network and report it as a job you found yourself;
  • If your application is successful and you start work, your Job Network provider will continue to call you seeking details of your new employer. You’ve got a job now, no need to tell them anything at all, simply hang up and do not tell them anything about your new employer, ever;
  • Whenever possible, if you are sent to do training, try to find another provider for said training and simply tell your provider you’re doing the training through another training provider, ensuring they are a Registered Training Organisation (RTO), and check to see that the RTO is not linked to (or owned by the same company or subsidiary company by cross-referencing ABN and ACN numbers using ASIC company database). This prevents your Job Network provider from getting kickbacks or making money;
  • If you are required to do ‘Work for the Dole’ or voluntary work, seek the activities yourself, not through your Job Network provider. Become a CFA or SES volunteer, help out at a Salvation Army store, but find the activity yourself, not through your Job Network agency and report this activity yourself via the Workforce website;

Whenever possible, report all these requirements yourself via the Workforce portal, don’t report it to your Job Network provider directly, that’s how they make a profit.

In other words, simply meet and do all the activities you are required to do yourself and report them directly via the Workforce website to meet your obligations and collect points.

This way, you can meet your requirements and will only have to attend your Job Network appointments. Even if they send you somewhere for an interview, just get all the details and do all the leg work yourself and again, self-report via the Workforce website.

Simply follow the rules, and meet your obligations, but do as much as you can without any assistance from your Job Network provider and self-report your efforts to the Workforce site as much as possible.

Further information can be found here (some information may be outdated) and here.

 

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